Where Differences Are Celebrated!

Where each child has hope. is respected. can succeed. is loved. is celebrated.

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Enrollment is open year round. Please contact us to learn more about our unique program.

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About Us

Have you been searching for a place where your child can be and feel successful and accepted? Elim might be the oasis you are looking for.

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Who We Serve

At Elim we celebrate learning differences, embrace academic challenges and address the needs of the whole child.

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What We Do

What makes Elim different? Personalized Education Plans developed in collaboration with parents, small class size, varied learning environments, and more…

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Success Stories

My son has asked twice about summer school. He wants to make sure he is keeping up, so he can finish on time. Not sure where this kid came from, but I like it. Less than two years ago I had to drag him to school. Now he gets mad if he misses.

Lance Neidigk – Elim Parent

One reason Elim is recommended … is that the teachers are very helpful. If you are stuck on a problem in math, or you have trouble pronouncing a word in language arts, the teachers can help you out some. As you progress further and further, they’ll still help you out, just not as much.

Elim Student

The school feels more like a family with dedicated, skilled and caring teachers accepting, guiding and pushing students to grow spiritually, academically, and socially.

Lisa Boedecker – Elim Parent

I’ve learned so much at Elim about loving others, loving God’s creation, loving myself and loving my neighbor. I’m grateful that my last two years of high school have been at Elim Christian School.

Elim Student

Elim has been a wonderful place for our son to not only learn but to feel loved, encouraged and inspired by his compassionate teachers. You feel God’s touch on everything they do here.

Angelique Brinkman – Elim Parent

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Latest News!

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Day one of the 2022/2023 school year at Elim is officially in the books! Thank you to all who have been praying for us and thank you to the parents for coming to our welcome assembly this morning. This was a very nice first day of school and we all enjoyed getting reacquainted after being apart for the summer. Classes went smoothly for the first day being on a block schedule, so it’s safe to say that it was successful.

Remember that Elim has open enrollment all year long, so if you are looking for a school that specializes in educating students with learning differences, and teaches from a Biblical worldview, then we might be the place for you!

For more information check out our website: www.elimchristianschool.org/
You can always call the office for more information or to schedule a tour: (281) 855-3546.
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10 hours ago
Day one of the 2022/2023 school year at Elim is officially in the books! Thank you to all who have been praying for us and thank you to the parents for coming to our welcome assembly this morning. This was a very nice first day of school and we all enjoyed getting reacquainted after being apart for the summer. Classes went smoothly for the first day being on a block schedule, so it’s safe to say that it was successful. 

Remember that Elim has open enrollment all year long, so if you are looking for a school that specializes in educating students with learning differences, and teaches from a Biblical worldview, then we might be the place for you!

For more information check out our website: https://www.elimchristianschool.org/
You can always call the office for more information or to schedule a tour: (281) 855-3546.

Photos from Elim Christian School's post ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago
Image attachmentImage attachment

It's August already and we are preparing Elim for the new school year. As you can see we are getting a bit of a face lift on the inside with a kitchen remodel and plenty of new storage in the common area. The good people at Peace Community Church have been working hard to finish by our first day of school on August 15th. The "after" photos will go up as soon as they are done!

If you have a student with learning differences and are looking for a place that will meet those needs from a Biblical worldview, please contact Elim Christian School at (281) 855-3546 or contact us through Facebook Messenger or on Instagram.
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago
Its August already and we are preparing Elim for the new school year. As you can see we are getting a bit of a face lift on the inside with a kitchen remodel and plenty of new storage in the common area. The good people at Peace Community Church have been working hard to finish by our first day of school on August 15th. The after photos will go up as soon as they are done!

If you have a student with learning differences and are looking for a place that will meet those needs from a Biblical worldview, please contact Elim Christian School at (281) 855-3546 or contact us through Facebook Messenger or on Instagram.Image attachmentImage attachment

We are very close to the end of the school year at Elim. In fact, our last day is Wednesday the 25th. We will wrap up our study through Hebrews 11 tomorrow with a look into the prophet Malachi. Today we covered Zechariah, a man who had very strange dreams (we can probably relate sometimes) and pleaded with Israel to worship God with sincerity. This was following the return to Jerusalem and coincides with the events mentioned in the book of Ezra.

Zechariah was calling for the Jews to worship God with their whole heart and to be faithful. Unfortunately, and like before, people were turning from God. Listening to the prophets was getting old and soon God would grant their wish. They did not want to hear the prophets, so God would stop sending them. One more remained, and about 100 years later God would send Malachi. Following Malachi, God would not speak to the people for over 400 years. The next prophet we see is who some consider the last Old Testament prophet, John the Baptist.

Zechariah tells us of a coming Messiah who would announce his reign by riding into Jerusalem on a donkey’s colt, coming in peace to reign forever. This was fulfilled on what we recognize as Palm Sunday. Five days later, after riding into Jerusalem, Jesus would be on the cross just as the scriptures foretold. On the third day after his crucifixion, Jesus would rise from the dead, also foretold by the prophets we have been studying. It’s been a wild ride through the gospel message in the Old Testament, but as I always say, everything in the Old Testament points to the cross… it’s all about Jesus.

(Pictured: Palm Sunday reenactment; see Zechariah 9:9)
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3 months ago
We are very close to the end of the school year at Elim. In fact, our last day is Wednesday the 25th. We will wrap up our study through Hebrews 11 tomorrow with a look into the prophet Malachi. Today we covered Zechariah, a man who had very strange dreams (we can probably relate sometimes) and pleaded with Israel to worship God with sincerity. This was following the return to Jerusalem and coincides with the events mentioned in the book of Ezra. 

Zechariah was calling for the Jews to worship God with their whole heart and to be faithful. Unfortunately, and like before, people were turning from God. Listening to the prophets was getting old and soon God would grant their wish. They did not want to hear the prophets, so God would stop sending them. One more remained, and about 100 years later God would send Malachi. Following Malachi, God would not speak to the people for over 400 years. The next prophet we see is who some consider the last Old Testament prophet, John the Baptist. 

Zechariah tells us of a coming Messiah who would announce his reign by riding into Jerusalem on a donkey’s colt, coming in peace to reign forever. This was fulfilled on what we recognize as Palm Sunday. Five days later, after riding into Jerusalem, Jesus would be on the cross just as the scriptures foretold. On the third day after his crucifixion, Jesus would rise from the dead, also foretold by the prophets we have been studying. It’s been a wild ride through the gospel message in the Old Testament, but as I always say, everything in the Old Testament points to the cross… it’s all about Jesus. 

(Pictured: Palm Sunday reenactment; see Zechariah 9:9)

This morning during devotions at Elim, we learned about our next Hero of the Faith (Hebrews 11), Haggai. I have been waiting patiently for the opportunity to talk to the students about Haggai because most of the prophets are covering what was going to happen due to God’s judgment with the promise of restoration. Well, finally, we are looking at the restoration. 70 years have passed since Babylon destroyed Jerusalem, and the new rulers, The Persians, have allowed the exiles to return to rebuild; not only that, they are paying for it to happen.

Sounds perfect, doesn’t it? Unfortunately, it wasn’t, which is why Haggai steps in to show the error of the people. The people were again being unfaithful because they focused all of their energy on rebuilding their homes without considering the point of the King of Persia’s decree, to rebuild the temple. The story of rebuilding can be seen in the book of Ezra as these two books should be read together for the whole story. The temple was eventually rebuilt after Haggai inspired the people to do so.

What else is significant? A man named Zerubbabel was placed in charge as the governor of the province and he had a very important ancestor, King David. The previous minor prophets had promised a return to the line of David with his reign lasting forever. If you turn to Matthew 1 and Luke 3, you notice that both Joseph and Mary’s family lines come from Zerubbabel and of course, King David. God was getting Israel ready for what would take place in 500 years, as the Apostle Paul put it, “Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men” (Philippians 2:5-7 ESV).
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3 months ago
This morning during devotions at Elim, we learned about our next Hero of the Faith (Hebrews 11), Haggai. I have been waiting patiently for the opportunity to talk to the students about Haggai because most of the prophets are covering what was going to happen due to God’s judgment with the promise of restoration. Well, finally, we are looking at the restoration. 70 years have passed since Babylon destroyed Jerusalem, and the new rulers, The Persians, have allowed the exiles to return to rebuild; not only that, they are paying for it to happen. 

Sounds perfect, doesn’t it? Unfortunately, it wasn’t, which is why Haggai steps in to show the error of the people. The people were again being unfaithful because they focused all of their energy on rebuilding their homes without considering the point of the King of Persia’s decree, to rebuild the temple. The story of rebuilding can be seen in the book of Ezra as these two books should be read together for the whole story. The temple was eventually rebuilt after Haggai inspired the people to do so. 

What else is significant? A man named Zerubbabel was placed in charge as the governor of the province and he had a very important ancestor, King David. The previous minor prophets had promised a return to the line of David with his reign lasting forever. If you turn to Matthew 1 and Luke 3, you notice that both Joseph and Mary’s family lines come from Zerubbabel and of course, King David. God was getting Israel ready for what would take place in 500 years, as the Apostle Paul put it, “Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men” (Philippians 2:5-7 ESV).

This morning during devotions at Elim, we learned about our next Hero of the Faith (Hebrews 11), Zephaniah. Unlike the prophets who have a specific pronouncement of God’s judgment on one or two nations, Zephaniah makes a general pronouncement about the sovereignty of God and His judgment on all nations. This judgment on all nations will be followed by restoration, a future hope. One can see how this ties neatly into the New Testament, hinted at in the gospels, but fully realized in the Acts of the Apostles at the beginning of the church age.

“All nations” is a theme of the Bible traced all the way back to Genesis 12 explicitly, but even further back to Genesis 3 to what scholars call, “The First Gospel.” God tells Abraham in Genesis 12:3 that all nations will be blessed through him. The Old Testament is full of examples of how God’s promise to Israel also includes all nations. Jesus commanded the disciples to go into the world and preach the good news to all nations. But when it was time, the disciples, specifically Peter, needed additional prompting as seen in Acts 10. Then once Peter figured it out, he convinced the others that they needed to be preaching the gospel to everyone.

The message is simple: God will judge all nations, but God will offer restoration and hope for those in the “all nations” who repent and honor Him. The message isn’t just for Israel, it is for us too, and we realize this through our faith in Christ.
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3 months ago
This morning during devotions at Elim, we learned about our next Hero of the Faith (Hebrews 11), Zephaniah. Unlike the prophets who have a specific pronouncement of God’s judgment on one or two nations, Zephaniah makes a general pronouncement about the sovereignty of God and His judgment on all nations. This judgment on all nations will be followed by restoration, a future hope. One can see how this ties neatly into the New Testament, hinted at in the gospels, but fully realized in the Acts of the Apostles at the beginning of the church age.

“All nations” is a theme of the Bible traced all the way back to Genesis 12 explicitly, but even further back to Genesis 3 to what scholars call, “The First Gospel.” God tells Abraham in Genesis 12:3 that all nations will be blessed through him. The Old Testament is full of examples of how God’s promise to Israel also includes all nations. Jesus commanded the disciples to go into the world and preach the good news to all nations. But when it was time, the disciples, specifically Peter, needed additional prompting as seen in Acts 10. Then once Peter figured it out, he convinced the others that they needed to be preaching the gospel to everyone. 

The message is simple: God will judge all nations, but God will offer restoration and hope for those in the “all nations” who repent and honor Him. The message isn’t just for Israel, it is for us too, and we realize this through our faith in Christ.
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